We’re moving!

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EDIT: 8TH FEB 2013 –

YOU CAN NOW FIND THE HUMAN GIVENS BLOG HERE: http://blog.humangivens.com/

I’m in the process of moving this blog from WordPress to a location on the MindFields College website. I’m so pleased with the amount of interesting content we’ve built up on this blog and I hope this can be continued at the new location which will look and perform the same but will just be under a different URL.

I’m still tinkering with the layout and pictures but from now on, to read more posts from Mindfields College and the Human Givens Institute on depression, anxiety, dreaming, psychosis, trauma, education, therapy and lots more – GO HERE —>>!

If you have links to this blog, I’d be so greatful if you could update them to direct to http://www.mindfields.org.uk/blog/

New Blog posts at the new location:

- Why do we yawn?
A human given: the need for autonomy and control
How To Be Cool And Attractive
Is the NHS capable of learning from nature?
Petals around the rose
Addiction Book Review
Why doesn’t dreaming de-arouse the emotions which result in trauma?
“If you really believe something is going to do you some harm, it will.”
- 15th Century Islamic medical textbook contains no mention of Schizophrenia

Thanks for all your support and see you over there!

we've moved

Eleanor Tyrrell

What about lucid dreaming?

Something I didn’t anticipate from feedback to our new dreaming website and the theory explored on it was how influential the phenomenon of lucid dreaming was. Lucid dreaming was fed back to us a few times as something Joe Griffin had overlooked, as a type of dreaming that the expectation fulfilment theory could not explain, but this is not the case.

Lucid dreaming seems to be a big issue in America particularly. It’s an ‘Art’, it’s a ‘Science’. Type “lucid dreaming” into Google and it yields 710,000 results, “LUCID DREAM IN JUST 7 DAYS – NEW KIT IS 100% GUARANTEED” – people have dedicated their lives to the phenomenon and are making money from it. People pay to ‘learn’ it and attain that magical state of gaining control of their own dreams.

Who wouldn’t want to be able to control their own behaviour in a dream, to experience all the reality, adventure and meaning first hand, instead of “wasting” those out of control 22 years of your life you spend sleeping, unable to influence your own behaviour like you can during the day?

We have added a section stating our position on lucid dreaming on the Why we Dream website as the subject has been covered in the Dreaming Reality book, we just didn’t anticipate the amount of interest this facet of dream research would generate!

“Theories of dreaming that do not allow for occasional lucidity are, necessarily, incorrect or incomplete, because lucid dreaming is an acknowledged phenomenon. Our view of the REM state and the function of dreaming does not exclude lucidity in dreams.

Lucid dreaming occurs in the REM state like any other phenomenon involving memory, metaphor and imagination. The same effects can be achieved through hypnosis, a focussed state of attention that artificially accesses the REM state. Knowledge of how to do this has been around for perhaps 40,000 thousand years.”

So if lucid dreaming interests you, please read the full What about lucid dreaming? section and other related pages for further information on why the expectation fulfilment theory of dreaming does not exclude lucid dreaming.

Posted by: Eleanor

Free therapy sessions

 joe griffin teaching

A core element of each Human Givens Diploma Course are the two live therapy sessions from Ivan Tyrrell and Joe Griffin on both weeks of the course. This gives our students the opportunity to experience the therapeutic process right in front of them, and is a vital teaching tool for someone being prepared to work effectively with distressed clients.

These two sessions are FREE, with expenses paid, and usual applicants suffer from a range of problems, including but not limited to: depression, anxiety, PTSD, trauma, sleeping problems, problematic anger, relationship difficulties, phobias, addiction, psychosis and obsessive compulsive disorder.

We are looking for suitable people to benefit from these free sessions this autumn at Gilwell Park in London on these dates:

Wednesday 12th September 2007 – Session 1
Tuesday 16th October 2007 – Session 2

Friday 14th September 2007 – Session 1
Thursday 18th October 2007 – Session 2

To discuss the free therapy sessions or if you would like an application, either ring Kathy Hardy on 01323 811 440 or email: kathyhardy@mindfields.org.uk


Posted by: Eleanor

David Grist at the Human Givens Conference


Here is clip from David Grist’s creativity in therapy presentation from the Human Givens Conference.

Piers Bishop explains the rewind technique for treating PTSD

PTSD, phobias and trauma are NOT life long conditions, and can be treated quickly and easily with the rewind technique, a non voyeuristic and fast method of detraumatising both individual and extended traumatic events.

Piers Bishop, a Human Givens Practitioner who specialises in treating PTSD explains why the technique works, what happens during it, and how to get help fast.

Don’t let suffering from PTSD or trauma symptoms control you, watch this video and change your life.

Posted by: Eleanor

Human Givens Journal – Issue 53

human givens journal

The latest issue of the Human Givens Journal is now out.

Major articles

Angry Soldier, unstable diagnosis, unholy muddle: Traumatised servicemen and women are getting a raw deal because of squabblings over diagnoses, says Piers Bishop.
Extract:

“From being incandescent with rage, B, the soldier who was going beserk, now just feels regret about the lost time: ‘I feel sad about the two years I drifted through and wasted, and regret at all the hurt I caused around me. But I now feel that I am able to get on with my life without the intrusive effects of PTSD. I have become much calmer and to this day have not had one flashback or re-inactment episode. I threw out my anti-depressants. I have reconnected to those around me and have been able to hold down a job . I can control my drinking. I hope that the detraumatising therapy which healed me gets the recognition it truely deserves, as it quick and effective. The alternative is wasteful and will put a burden on the already overstretched NHS. For someone suffering from PTSD, there is nothing to lose in having the rewind treatment, and the opportunity to get their life back.'”

The meanings of psychosis: Our own cognitive and perceptual ‘fault lines’ can help us understand psychotic patients. Michael Garrett, David Stone and Douglas Turkington explain

Helpless to help: What it is like to care for a psychotic brother when professionals don’t know how to help

Ask, don’t tell: Noël Janis Norton discusses with Denise Winn how even the most challenging of children can be motivated to learn

“How can you sleep at night?”: Denise Winn finds out how lawyers cope psychologically when defending clients accused of committing abhorrent crimes

On the receiving end: Caroline Gallup describes the emotional upheaval she and her husband experienced during stressful infertility treatment

The carrot and the stick: Mark Evans describes how his use of rewards and punishments in therapy has helped clients quickly achieve change

The journal is also packed with the usual news, views and information, book reviews and letters.

You can read more about the quarterly journal here and subscribe to it here. (UK yearly subscription =£30, Overseas yearly subscription =£38)

Posted by: Eleanor

Mental illness is 2nd largest reason for time off work

“Mental illness is now the second largest reason for UK workers taking time off, a report suggests.

A study by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development found an increasing amount of sickness leave is due to depression or stress.

Analysis of the records of 30,000 people found only muscle-related problems such as bad backs were cited as a greater cause of absenteeism.
Staff with depression were said to take an average 30 days off annually.

Those with stress were reported to be away for 21 days.

The CPID found public sector workers were more likely to take time off work because of mental illness and overall the problem was more prevalent among older staff.

Reduced hours

The CIPD said its findings will be “particularly worrying” for the government in light of a “huge” increase in the number of people with mental health problems claiming incapacity benefit.

“This research shows how important it is for managers and HR practitioners to be aware of the signs of mental ill health so that they can take action early and provide support before the individual’s condition deteriorates to the point they go off on long-term sick leave,” said Ben Willmott, CIPD employee relations adviser.

He called on the government to provide tax incentives to encourage more firms to offer occupational health services.

GPs need to work more closely with employers to identify opportunities for “phased return-to-work” for those affected with less demanding or reduced hours roles, Mr Willmott added.”
Source

Posted by: Eleanor