Category Archives: Depression

Free therapy sessions

 joe griffin teaching

A core element of each Human Givens Diploma Course are the two live therapy sessions from Ivan Tyrrell and Joe Griffin on both weeks of the course. This gives our students the opportunity to experience the therapeutic process right in front of them, and is a vital teaching tool for someone being prepared to work effectively with distressed clients.

These two sessions are FREE, with expenses paid, and usual applicants suffer from a range of problems, including but not limited to: depression, anxiety, PTSD, trauma, sleeping problems, problematic anger, relationship difficulties, phobias, addiction, psychosis and obsessive compulsive disorder.

We are looking for suitable people to benefit from these free sessions this autumn at Gilwell Park in London on these dates:

Wednesday 12th September 2007 – Session 1
Tuesday 16th October 2007 – Session 2

Friday 14th September 2007 – Session 1
Thursday 18th October 2007 – Session 2

To discuss the free therapy sessions or if you would like an application, either ring Kathy Hardy on 01323 811 440 or email: kathyhardy@mindfields.org.uk


Posted by: Eleanor

Piers Bishop explains the rewind technique for treating PTSD

PTSD, phobias and trauma are NOT life long conditions, and can be treated quickly and easily with the rewind technique, a non voyeuristic and fast method of detraumatising both individual and extended traumatic events.

Piers Bishop, a Human Givens Practitioner who specialises in treating PTSD explains why the technique works, what happens during it, and how to get help fast.

Don’t let suffering from PTSD or trauma symptoms control you, watch this video and change your life.

Posted by: Eleanor

Mental illness is 2nd largest reason for time off work

“Mental illness is now the second largest reason for UK workers taking time off, a report suggests.

A study by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development found an increasing amount of sickness leave is due to depression or stress.

Analysis of the records of 30,000 people found only muscle-related problems such as bad backs were cited as a greater cause of absenteeism.
Staff with depression were said to take an average 30 days off annually.

Those with stress were reported to be away for 21 days.

The CPID found public sector workers were more likely to take time off work because of mental illness and overall the problem was more prevalent among older staff.

Reduced hours

The CIPD said its findings will be “particularly worrying” for the government in light of a “huge” increase in the number of people with mental health problems claiming incapacity benefit.

“This research shows how important it is for managers and HR practitioners to be aware of the signs of mental ill health so that they can take action early and provide support before the individual’s condition deteriorates to the point they go off on long-term sick leave,” said Ben Willmott, CIPD employee relations adviser.

He called on the government to provide tax incentives to encourage more firms to offer occupational health services.

GPs need to work more closely with employers to identify opportunities for “phased return-to-work” for those affected with less demanding or reduced hours roles, Mr Willmott added.”
Source

Posted by: Eleanor

Our Amazon rankings!

If you type in ‘Depression’ in book search, on amazon.co.uk, 4,851 titles come up.

The Human Givens book on depression is No.3

If you type in ‘Anxiety’, 1,928 titles come up.

The Human Givens book on anxiety is No.2

If you type ‘Addiction’ 6,196 titles come up.


The Human Givens book on addiction is No.1

Posted by: Eleanor

Why do depressed people wake up exhausted?

Just another plug for Ivan Tyrrell’s (Principal of MindFields College) YouTube video on the link between depression and dreaming – if you haven’t already seen it!

For further information on why depressed people wake up exhausted see here: www.why-we-dream.com/depression.htm

Posted by: Eleanor

Best of the MindFields College Blog

Since last September we’ve had 72 posts on this blog on many different topics, so I’m going to filter out a few of what I consider the most interesting or important posts and put them all in the same place.

The Dream Catcher: Read the New Scientist interview with Joe Griffin  answering questions on REM sleep, depression, psychosis, trauma, conflict and cult behaviour
To sleep, perchance to dearouse: An account of my most vivid personal experience of dreaming dearousing a traumatic event I witnessed.

The Origins of the Human Givens Approach: Find out how the human givens approach originated.

The Magic Porridge Pot: Ivan Tyrrell bravely writes on ‘autistic’ government thinking and over regulation and what to do about it.

The link between dreaming and depression: Watch a short video which explains why depressed people wake up exhausted

How the link between REM sleep and depression affects the treatment of Bipolar disorder: Discussing Bipolar disorder, a post prompted by a question from another blogger.

This country needs more than ‘Supernannies’: Why the ‘givens’ of human nature should be the touchstone of any government policy.

What makes a good therapist or counsellor?: A checklist drawn up to protect people from potentially harmful types of counselling.

The link between worrying and depression: How worrying always preceeds depression, why this is related to REM sleep, and what you can do to break the cycle.

Is the NHS capable of learning from nature?: What is an effective system, and is the NHS one?
Posted by: Eleanor

PTSD: Fitting the definition

The excellent Anxiety, Addiction and Depression Treatments blog reported on an interesting study last week which suggested that the definition of PTSD needs to be more specific to avoid incorrect diagnosis.

“Based on clinical evidence that severely depressed patients also display many of the symptoms falling under the PTSD label, researchers believe that its definition needs to be refined in order to avoid frequently incorrect diagnoses. In a study of one hundred patients suffering from deep depression, researchers had them answer questions about whether they had experienced some of the varied symptoms of PTSD. To clarify the information given, two independent experts interviewed patients to determine which had undergone events fitting the definition of “traumatic” and whether these events might account for their present states. A majority of the study’s subjects had undergone such trauma, and most of that number also qualified for PTSD diagnoses, but the study’s most important finding was that an equal percentage of the patients without notable traumas could, under the current definition, be classified as suffering from PTSD. Such an overlap, experts say, has the potential to confuse treatments and render them ineffective.”

“Researchers say no clearly distinct biological differences between depression and PTSD have been established, though post-traumatic patients seem to respond differently to certain hormonal therapies. Differences, however subtle, exist between patients suffering from psychological disorders drawn from direct events and those who are clinically depressed, even though the two overlap in terms of observable symptoms and certain treatments may prove effective for both. This study suggests that we have yet to understand the intricacies of PTSD and that, in order to treat it more specifically in the future, we should immediately sponsor additional large-scale research projects with the ultimate goal of making these crucial distinctions at a time when an increasing percentage of our general population and especially our armed forces faces the debilitating effects of post-traumatic stress every day.”

And thank you Sisyphus for my Thinking Blogger nomination!

Posted by: Eleanor