Category Archives: News

Fast treatment denied to traumatised soldiers coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan

The 18-month wait endured by front line troops before they can get treatment for their panic attacks, anger outbursts, nightmares and flashbacks hit the headlines with a vengeance over the weekend.

ptsd

However, many aspects of the story were not covered by journalists, for example, the scandal that “government guidelines recommend CBT for treating PTSD” when this is known to be a largely ineffective treatment for this condition. No wonder it was reported in The Sunday Times that a trustee of the National Gulf Veterans and Families Association said: “I’ve never come across any veteran who was happy with their NHS treatment for PTSD.”

Another strange aspect is that American research clearly demonstrates that about 25% of people exposed to traumatic events develop PTSD and yet the MOD are maintaining that only 2% of front line troops go on to suffer these debilitating symptoms.

If you know of anyone who needs detraumatising go to our online register to find a human givens therapist who will usually be able to help a sufferer quickly using the rewind technique. This non-intrusive and safe psychological technique (which is taught on our workshop: The fast trauma and phobia cure), is regularly used by HG therapists to relieve people of post-traumatic stress caused by a wide range of traumatic events, from accidents and severe sexual abuse to injury sustained in bomb blasts and experiences of war.

For more information about trauma and PTSD, click here.

Posted by: Ivan

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Common Ground: diplomacy and the human givens

jerusalem

If you are interested in the Middle East conflict, I’ve just put up a fascinating article from a 2006 issue of the Human Givens Journal by John Bell.

He is the Middle East Director for Search for Common Ground and a founding member of the Jerusalem Old City Initiative and suggests that only a ‘radically different, innate needs-based approach to conflict resolution can bring a possibility of peace to the Middle East’.

“DIPLOMATIC intervention seems, in this day and age, to be less and less effective as an instrument of managing frictions and conflicts between states. This is particularly so in the Middle East, where venture after diplomatic venture has failed; indeed, they have possibly even exacerbated the troubles there.

At its core, the Middle East conflict speaks to the ancient human need to protect against outside threat. The irony is that the methods the region has developed to do so now propagate those threats by blurring the need for security with other unidentified essential needs, no longer meeting any of them clearly and, as a result, exacerbating problems with outsiders. If diplomacy is to offer any useful answers, it needs a fresh approach and a clear understanding of human needs, how they manifest and how to meet them…” read more

Posted by: Eleanor

Creating healthy environments in psychiatric wards

no straight jackets

No straight jackets? 

Here’s a cheerful feature from The Guardian about a new male psychiatric ward in South London called The Tarn.  Everyone working at the centre recognises the importance of creating a safe, responsible, stimulating and status rich environment for the severely unstable and often violent men who live there – and the article reports on their very positive results:

 “Francis Adzinku, the trust’s acute and crisis services manager, insists that he and his colleagues developed their distinctive approach in former, very rundown wards, and that it is much more about attitudes and principles.

“If you prepare an environment where you think people are going to throw things around, then they come prepared to do that,” Adzinku says. “But if you put people in an environment where they feel comfortable, where it is clean and where there are nice things to look at, the effect can be wonderful. The philosophy is to have, as much as possible, an ideal environment, and we have a very good multi-disciplinary team who have a clear idea of the philosophy they are working with.” read the article

Posted by: Eleanor

A human givens team is to train trauma counsellors in Rwanda

The inter-tribal genocide in 1994 left a huge legacy of trauma in the population of Rwanda.  People who suffered or witnessed terrible events may still be living in the same village as those who inflicted these horrors.  Dealing with the personal memories of these traumas is vital for the future wellbeing of both the individuals concerned and the communities they live in.

Moved by the plight of the Rwandans, two MindFields College graduates, Pamela Woodford and Maarit Brooks, have decided to do something to help and on 24th May they will be travelling to Rwanda to deliver training in the refined HG version of the rewind technique and the human givens approach to mental health. They will be away for ten days and will be training up to 60 local counsellors on how to treat trauma.

Pamela and Maarit will be working with a local partner agency REACH (Reconciliation, Evangelism And Christian Healing) which was formed in 1996 in response to the genocide.  Since then, the organisation has trained 3,680 people in reconciliation approaches, including local religious and government leaders, women and young people, belonging to both Christian and Muslim communities.  Their work is now moving from community level reconciliation to dealing with unresolved personal trauma.

Preparation for the training will involve translating the materials into the local language and working with the interpreters who will help Pamela and Maarit deliver the training sessions.  They are funding the trip themselves and will be travelling with their husbands who intend to record the trip and handle necessary admin.

Whilst the thought of delivering training like this into a different culture and language could be daunting, Pamela and Maarit are both full of enthusiasm for the difference the human givens approach will bring to individuals’ lives in Rwanda.  Even so, they would warmly welcome any insights from anyone about localisation of the human givens approach to African cultures – if think you may have any useful advice to give, please leave a comment on this blog or contact us and we will put you in touch.

We wish them all a safe and successful trip, look out for an update (and maybe even some photos!) on how their trip went on this blog and also in the HG e-newsletter.

Posted by: Jane

Waste in the NHS

I’m not quite sure why I haven’t noticed this before but here is an excellent video from the very beginning of this year about wasted money in the NHS, much thanks to Burning Our Money for this.

The other videos are also worth watching – but I can’t sit down to more than one at once because my anger levels rise too much to give them the concentration they deserve!

Posted by: Eleanor

A greater need for therapy to treat gamblers

Adding to the NHS’s mounting ‘to do’ list comes a call for better access to therapy for addicted gamblers.

“Former postman Neil Humphreys checked himself in after amassing debts of £16,000 – the same amount as he earned in a year. His gambling hobby became an addiction when he discovered internet casinos. It nearly destroyed his life.
“It just seemed to get hold of me,” he says.
“I actually tried to get rid of my computer at one point but then I started going to internet cafes and I was doing it there, so I couldn’t get away from it.
“I kept wanting to stop but as soon as I could get hold of some more money, I was back on it.”
Mr Humphreys tried closing his accounts with the online sites he was gambling on. But that did not work. He received emails and phone calls offering him free bets. In the end, he took up an offer of $250 free bets and started gambling again. Having lost everything, he is now surviving on benefits. It will take him 10 years to pay his debts back.”

Addiction occurs when chemical reward systems in the brain activated by whatever you’re addicted to start compensating for a lack of natural, more ‘wholesome’ rewards in your everyday life. Working towards a healthier life in which emotional needs are met is the starting point for addiction therapy.

Creating a society in which these needs can be more easily met should be a priority for the government, considering plans for ‘supercasinos’ that have been bandied about recently.

>> Read more about addiction here

Posted by: Eleanor

From anti-depressants to anti-psychotics

“36% of people were found to have been prescribed more than the maximum recommended dose of anti-psychotic medicines.”

..says the Prescribing Observatory for Mental Health.

Posted by: Eleanor